The Evan Lurie Gallery will feature an exhibition of works by Chicago-based artists Gian Garofalo and Eric Lee, as well as popular local artist Jason Myers.  The show will open with an Artist Reception and extended gallery hours on Saturday, August 11, 2012 from 5 - 10 pm, and will run through September 7, 2012.  This event is free of charge and open to the general public.

The work of Jason Myers to be exhibited is a sneak peek into his Visible Noise Project.  The Visible Noise Project is the latest development from the studio of Jason Myers. This new exploration combines existing content and mediums from the past ten years with modern technology, media, and processes found in today’s high-resolution culture. The purpose of this new work is to further explore and develop man's struggle to find a cohesive synthesis with his environment. The blending of new media allows a greater development and understanding of the emotional expressions so prevalent in current society.

In order to accomplish this new stage of development, Jason has stepped down as director of ARTBOX Gallery. This has allowed the time needed to collaborate with other artists currently involved in the new mediums. Most notably, long time design business partner Norman Cisler, with his wide array of chemical coating/material/aesthetic expertise, and Sohail El-Rahaiby, video/choreography expert. This demanding new project also incorporates many new industry partners such as NEC and Samsung.

Eric Lee is a self-taught abstract painter, born in Brooklyn, New York.  Eric’s work includes back painted frameless glass paintings and functional art.  He pioneered the process with an innovative method that seals the back of glass surfaces against damage from moisture and abrasion.  The treatment has the additional benefit of creating an airtight backing.

Lee spent roughly twenty years as a technical consultant to some of the world's leading architectural design firms.  He worked on a wide array of projects…including the Guggenheim Soho, Armand Hammer and Andy Warhol museums, among others.  His involvement in numerous noteworthy “art related” architectural projects undoubtedly has had an impact on his evolution as an artist. Eric credits his career working within the design community as the source of his inspiration.

Eric says, “I feel I spent most of my adult life developing my aesthetic sensibility.  Until now, the influences on my work have been largely from outside the art world.  I also find myself being energized and challenged as I seek to find my path in art.... trying to stay true to the songs that sing to me.”

Gian Garofalo is a multi-disciplinary artist interested in materials and process. Each painting is created with colors mixed from pigments and mediums. Applied layer upon layer, the process requires patience, forgiveness and discipline. The colorful drip and stripe combinations are arranged by intuition, random selection and personal taste. These paintings consist of a rainbow of colors where each individual drip is an equally important and unique contribution to the work as a whole. Gian continually strives for beautiful, intriguing and mesmerizing.

The exhibition opening and Artist Reception will occur in conjunction with the Carmel Arts District's Second Saturday Gallery Walk.  The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 W. Main Street, Carmel, IN.

 

 

 

 

 

Victor Wang Banner

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery opens “Luscious: New Works by Victor Wang"

 

Carmel, IN – October 18, 2011 – The Evan Lurie Gallery, located at the heart of the Carmel Arts and Design District, is pleased to present "Luscious: New Works by Victor Wang," an exhibition of the recent work of artist Victor Wang.  The show will open with an Artist Reception on Saturday, November 12 from 5 - 10 pm, and will be on view through December 9, 2011.  This event is free of charge and open to the general public.


Victor Wang's work is multilayered, in more than one sense of the word.  At first glance, his paintings present as stunning portraits that exemplify technical mastery in the tradition of Caravaggio, Titian, and Rembrandt, as well as an inherent understanding of light and shadow.  There is a spontaneous, sensual quality to the textural, almost sculptural application of paint to canvas.  (Wang cites the sculpture of Auguste Rodin as another classical influence.)  But below the surface lie hidden layers of both meaning and process.  Starting with a blank canvas, he attaches images from Tang Dynasty paintings that he digitally photographs and prints.  Over this collage, he applies layers of freehand sketches, acrylic matte medium, and oil paint, leaving small areas of the undercollage visible only to the careful viewer.


The subject matter, too, incorporates levels of meaning, drawing symbolism from Wang's own personal history to illustrate the human experience.  He is deeply inspired by his heritage and the events of his past: growing up in Northeast China, being sent to a mandatory labor camp in his youth during China's Cultural Revolution, immigrating to the United States on 1987 to start again from nothing, and ultimately finding success as an artist and professor at Fontbonne University in St. Louis, Missouri.  "For me, what I imagined of America and what actually was truly created a great gap, thus forming a battle between physical settlement and mental anxiety."  It is this emotional drama, Wang says, that he tries to display in his work.


One of the most consistent symbols to appear in his paintings is the sunflower, which for the artist evokes feelings of both joy and sorrow.  He recalls playing among the sunflowers he planted in his backyard as a child - a happy, carefree time.  Later, during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, the sunflower became a political symbol, representing the people of China following Mao the way flowers turn to follow the sun.  It was during this time, after his graduation from high school, when Wang was sent to a farm to do hard labor for almost three years as part of a mandatory "Reeducation Through Labor" program.  Performing grueling work in the sunflower fields, exposed to the elements and without the aid of equipment, another layer of meaning and memory was added to the symbol of the sunflower for Wang.  "When I see them," he has said, "it brings me back to the past, which has many ups and downs.  Sunflowers truly represent and stir my emotions."


Combining his rich personal history, Art History, and a technique both classical and experimental in nature, Victor Wang's work has been exhibited widely across the country and internationally, and has won a number of awards for excellence.

 

 

 

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery opens “Weaving Ephemeral Elements,”

Works by Alexi Torres

 

Carmel, IN – October 4, 2011 – The Evan Lurie Gallery, located at the heart of the Carmel Arts and Design District, is pleased to present "Weaving Ephemeral Elements," an exhibition of the work of painter Alexi Torres.  The show will open with an Artist Reception on Saturday, October 8, 2011 from 5-10 pm, and will be on view through November 11, 2011.  This event is free of charge and open to the general public.

 

Alexi Torres is a Cuban-born artist whose work has dealt with the issues of history, nationhood, exploration, and the representation of iconic images of culture - both modern and classical.  Torres' visual lexicon is elemental - he seems drawn to images that are forthright and instantly recognizable: pop culture icons such as Elvis Presley or Oprah Winfrey; symbols from the flipside of the cult of personality such as a news cameraman or a "garden" of microphones; images of nationhood and the violence that often accompanies it, as in "Old Guns" or "Reamerica" - a large-scale representation of the American flag, into which has been "woven" other symbols: political, religious, corporate, and nostalgic.


This "woven" effect, painstakingly rendered in oil on canvas, is what characterizes Torres' latest work, a series entitled "Reconstructing the Classics."  Upon close examination, intricate patterns and details reveal themselves, as if the iconic images of Marilyn Monroe or the Notre Dame Cathedral have been woven from reeds, feathers, or other bits of natural elements.  Torres says of his recent works, "Remaking classic images, such as an historic moment or icon that is well-known, while changing the whole concept, transmits a fresh and direct message - to be as human and more interconnected as one, weaving ourselves to create forms in all kinds of designs."


Born in 1976 in Matanzas, Cuba, Torres began painting when he was nine years old.  After immigrating to the United States in 2003, he became quickly established in the art community of Atlanta, GA as the founder and master artist of Buckhead Murals.  When asked where he got his inspiration to launch his business, he recalls a visit to Las Vegas.  "What intrigued me the most was not the glitz and gambling, it was the amazing murals found throughout the hotels and casinos.  I knew that I could do this...I have studied art and painting my whole life and I believe in myself."  Translated to works on canvas, the larger-than-life scale of Torres' paintings retain some of the feel of his mural work.  Torres now has a studio in Atlanta's TULA Art Center, once a thriving warehouse district that was transformed into a gallery and studio complex in the early 1980's.  It is now home to the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia, several galleries, and over 30 working artists' studios.

 

 

 

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery presents “Of An Earthly Manner: New Works by Luis Sanchez and Stephanie Gardner”


Carmel, IN – July 27, 2011 – The Evan Lurie Gallery is pleased to present “Of An Earthly Manner,” an exhibition of new works by artists Luis Sanchez and Stephanie Gardner. The opening of the exhibition will be held in conjunction with the Carmel Arts and Design District's Second Saturday Gallery Walk on August 13, 2011.


On the surface, the works of Sanchez and Gardner may seem to be thematically opposed – Gardner's work being abstract, meditative, and exploring themes of nature and its processes, and the work of Sanchez being figurative, sometimes gritty, and centered on the human condition. What these works share, however, is even deeper – not only an earthy palette, but also creative processes that harken back to past eras, and connections to the earth and the landscapes that inspired these processes.


Luis Sanchez reinvents the ancient process of fresco in his work, painting details of degraded stucco walls remembered from his childhood in Mexico City. A diverse talent, Sanchez works in both figurative and abstract paintings as well as sculpture, incorporating such earthy media as dry pigments and stucco, and combining the image of the human figure with decaying walls of the urban world in a juxtaposition of color, texture and dimension. His masterful use of the trompe l'oeil technique can, at first glance, make his two-dimensional canvases indistinguishable from his found-object assemblages. Sanchez’s subject matter is both grim and sublime, realistic and idealistic. There is an element of circus whimsy, and yet, as stated by Artspeak NY in a March 1997 article, Sanchez paints in the “unflinching tradition of Frida Kahlo.” The resulting aesthetic is a profound statement of light and dark, life and death, and the role we play in it. His works seamlessly combine the old and new, and have an uncanny way of mixing architecture with the human form. His work brings the past to the present, and reminds us that the past holds the truth to the future.


Coming from generations of artists, Stephanie Gardner began painting as a very young child. Gardner's work is an exploration into the depths of abstract painting. Her canvases, which exude a meditative quality through layers of color and images, incorporate a multitude of media including proprietary recipes developed over the last twenty years. The artist's early passion for chemistry and her blending of diverse materials, combined with years of experimentation, have allowed her to create her own unique formulations of pigments. This sets her work apart and creates an exclusive identity as well as a complex palette, paralleled only by that found in nature. While undeniably contemporary, her paintings evoke a sense of timelessness, with allusions to the ephemeral processes of nature lying hidden, waiting to be discovered. Her works, which may depict a fallen leaf, the bough of a tree left barren by the onset of winter, the skin of ripening fruit, or roots below the surface of the earth, often resemble acts of nature more so than the profoundly contemplated paintings they in fact are.


“Of An Earthly Manner” opens on August 13th and will continue through September 10th, 2011. The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, in the heart of the Carmel Arts and Design District.

 

 

 

June 2011 Second Saturday

 

Carmel Arts & Design District Second Saturday Gallery Walk and Rock the District Event

 

Carmel, IN - June 11, 2011 - The Evan Lurie Gallery presents the official opening of its new show featuring the work of artists Dale Threlkeld, Bates Wilson, James Georgopoulos, and Carlo Borer.  The June Second Saturday Gallery Walk will take place during the Carmel Arts & Design District's annual Rock The District event, which features live musical performances, special events, activities, food, and vendors.  The festivities begin at 11:00 am, and The Evan Lurie Gallery will have extended hours until 10pm. 

Additional public parking is now available on the upper floor of the Sophia Square building at 110 West Main Street, Carmel, IN.

Swiss designer and sculptor Carlo Borer works entirely in three dimensions, from the development of objects in virtual space using CAD to the precise craftsmanship with which he creates his sculptures in the real world. Utilizing a variety of materials, especially steel and stainless steel, he carries forward the use of high-tech tools such as lasers throughout his creative process to produce objects that are concrete yet unearthly, curvilinear yet not quite organic. Many of his works are left untitled, so as not to provide any predetermined associations, leaving the interpretation of the forms open to the viewer’s imagination, perception, and interaction with the objects. Born in 1961 in Solothurn, Switzerland, self-taught, and with no formal art school training, Borer has worked as a fine artist and industrial designer since 1981. In 2008, he won the Kanton of Solothurn, Switzerland Prize for Sculpture, and has exhibited his work in both Europe and the United States.

Los Angeles-based artist James Georgopoulos has worked with a variety of media including photography, traditional darkroom developing, painting and silkscreen to convey his powerful and colorful vision. Since the late 1980’s, his passion and talent have led his career down various interconnected paths - as a production designer in the motion picture industry working with such well-known directors as Zack Snyder and Oliver Stone, as photographer and videographer for many influential musicians, and as a designer of Hollywood studio and network facilities. His recent photographic series, "Guns of Cinema," showcases the artist’s technical mastery of film developing and silver gelatin printing, and employs stark and provocative imagery of actual firearms used as props in television and films to challenge viewers to examine not only our relation to the objects themselves, but also the associations created by history and popular culture.

Born and raised in rural Missouri, artist Dale Threlkeld has Midwestern roots. Inspired early on by his mother, teachers, and the colorful imagery that surrounded him as he traveled the horse racing circuit with his jockey and trainer father, Threlkeld’s vibrant and fluid abstract paintings are an exploration of process and chemistry – in the artist’s words, “a revelation.” After attending Northeast Missouri State University, Ball State University, and Southern Illinois University, he began his career with his first New York exhibition at the Gimpel & Weitzenhoffer Gallery, followed shortly by showings at The Dubuque Museum of Art, The Illinois State Museum, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Threlkeld describes his method as an “adventure…full of the potential unknown.” Though he uses materials familiar to artists for centuries – oil on canvas or linen – he employs techniques which, according to the artist, “allow me to freely explore the unknown in a unique way. Through the alchemy of paint and personal technique I seek to make paintings that move the viewer.”

After moving from his native Atlanta to New York City in the late 1980’s to pursue an acting career, Bates Wilson began to furnish his apartment with pieces of furniture made from found pieces of scrap metal and other recycled materials. Moving next to the walls (and filling them), he began work on his “Flow” series – fish that would hang from the ceiling and create an aquarium-like atmosphere. When he began to sell pieces of his work, his career as a sculptor was launched. One of Wilson’s most iconic pieces, an American flag made from aluminum and copper, was completed during an artist’s residency in Canada during the summer of 2001. When he lost a friend in the attacks on the World Trade Center that September, he returned the money he had received for the commission of the flag piece and brought it to Union Square as a memorial. The piece is now part of the permanent collection of the New York Historical Society. Wilson uses iconic imagery and discarded materials to incorporate and express the symbolism and ideals of current generations. Through the use of found objects and recycled materials, his intention is to give the objects “a rebirth, a resurrection – a complete new life” and to bring movement to static materials. Wilson has shown his work throughout the United States and in South America, Europe and Australia.



Race Weekend Preview Banner

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery opens Race Weekend Preview Show

 

Carmel, IN – May 27, 2011 – The Evan Lurie Gallery will kick off the summer with its Race Weekend Preview Show, an exhibition of work by artists Carlo Borer, James Georgopoulos, Dale Threlkeld, and Bates Wilson.  The show will open with a special preview event and extended gallery hours on Friday, May 27, 2011 from 5-10 pm, and will run through July 5, 2011.  Chosen for their whimsical styles and unique utilization of materials, we are excited to be displaying the work of these four internationally renowned artists for the first time in the gallery.


Swiss designer and sculptor Carlo Borer works entirely in three dimensions, from the development of objects in virtual space using CAD to the precise craftsmanship with which he creates his sculptures in the real world. Utilizing a variety of materials, especially steel and stainless steel, he carries forward the use of high-tech tools such as lasers throughout his creative process to produce objects that are concrete yet unearthly, curvilinear yet not quite organic. Many of his works are left untitled, so as not to provide any predetermined associations, leaving the interpretation of the forms open to the viewer’s imagination, perception, and interaction with the objects. Born in 1961 in Solothurn, Switzerland, self-taught, and with no formal art school training, Borer has worked as a fine artist and industrial designer since 1981. In 2008, he won the Kanton of Solothurn, Switzerland Prize for Sculpture, and has exhibited his work in both Europe and the United States.


Los Angeles-based artist James Georgopoulos has worked with a variety of media including photography, traditional darkroom developing, painting and silkscreen to convey his powerful and colorful vision. Since the late 1980’s, his passion and talent have led his career down various interconnected paths - as a production designer in the motion picture industry working with such well-known directors as Zack Snyder and Oliver Stone, as photographer and videographer for many influential musicians, and as a designer of Hollywood studio and network facilities. His recent photographic series, "Guns of Cinema," showcases the artist’s technical mastery of film developing and silver gelatin printing, and employs stark and provocative imagery of actual firearms used as props in television and films to challenge viewers to examine not only our relation to the objects themselves, but also the associations created by history and popular culture.


Born and raised in rural Missouri, artist Dale Threlkeld has Midwestern roots. Inspired early on by his mother, teachers, and the colorful imagery that surrounded him as he traveled the horse racing circuit with his jockey and trainer father, Threlkeld’s vibrant and fluid abstract paintings are an exploration of process and chemistry – in the artist’s words, “a revelation.” After attending Northeast Missouri State University, Ball State University, and Southern Illinois University, he began his career with his first New York exhibition at the Gimpel & Weitzenhoffer Gallery, followed shortly by showings at The Dubuque Museum of Art, The Illinois State Museum, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Threlkeld describes his method as an “adventure…full of the potential unknown.” Though he uses materials familiar to artists for centuries – oil on canvas or linen – he employs techniques which, according to the artist, “allow me to freely explore the unknown in a unique way. Through the alchemy of paint and personal technique I seek to make paintings that move the viewer.”


After moving from his native Atlanta to New York City in the late 1980’s to pursue an acting career, Bates Wilson began to furnish his apartment with pieces of furniture made from found pieces of scrap metal and other recycled materials. Moving next to the walls (and filling them), he began work on his “Flow” series – fish that would hang from the ceiling and create an aquarium-like atmosphere. When he began to sell pieces of his work, his career as a sculptor was launched. One of Wilson’s most iconic pieces, an American flag made from aluminum and copper, was completed during an artist’s residency in Canada during the summer of 2001. When he lost a friend in the attacks on the World Trade Center that September, he returned the money he had received for the commission of the flag piece and brought it to Union Square as a memorial. The piece is now part of the permanent collection of the New York Historical Society. Wilson uses iconic imagery and discarded materials to incorporate and express the symbolism and ideals of current generations. Through the use of found objects and recycled materials, his intention is to give the objects “a rebirth, a resurrection – a complete new life” and to bring movement to static materials. Wilson has shown his work throughout the United States and in South America, Europe and Australia.


The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, Carmel, IN 46032. Doors will be open for the official event from 5:00 – 10:00 pm. The event and any lectures posted in the future are free of charge and open to the general public.

 


 

The Evan Lurie Gallery to Re-open with Show “Abstraction Faction”


Carmel, IN – March 12, 2011 – The Evan Lurie Gallery, located in the heart of the Carmel Arts and Design District will officially re-open to the public on March 12, 2011. The gallery will be taking part in the March “Second Saturday” gallery walk with a group abstract show originally scheduled for February entitled “Abstraction Faction” featuring new work from artists Daniela Wicki, A. Dale Nally, Jason Myers and Brad Howe. The gallery had previously been closed since January of 2011 to make repairs from water damage.

 

The abstract nature of Ms. Daniela Wicki’s work comes alive with elements of depth and the occasional whimsy, as she has incorporated various mediums into her paintings and sculptures throughout her career. Often her understanding of light, or in fact lack of light, is central to her work with various pieces of her collections incorporating electricity or taking on a glow-in-the-dark characteristic. Born in Lima (Peru), Wicki left a promising teenage talent in classically trained art aside when she pursued what became a very successful career in law and business. When this path led her to the artist Mecca of New York City, she was once again reunited with her passion for art. With an inherent New York City energy surrounding her and the inspiration from The Museum of Modern Art, Wicki soon developed her abstract style of today. In 1997 she moved to Miami, Florida where she lives now as a full time abstract artist with shows worldwide.

 

A. Dale Nally, another Miami based abstract artist, manages a serenity in his work that ties seamlessly into the vibrancy of the show. While Nally paints in an attempt to discover a sense of quiet, his words ironically speak quite vividly to the profound state of being. Developed with layer upon layer and through various mediums, it takes only a moment to see the simplicity of each abstract concept having been created only after a great deal of consideration. The result is a reminder that beauty and self-reflection come as a result of a journey, a path that is often as unspoken as it is complex. Nally, a Kentucky native, has made his journey from the farms of the south to the coastal Miami area and paints with the language of the elements he has known from the nature he grew up in and is currently around: soil, air, water, sunlight, moss, fire and decay. Of his work Nally says, “I am constantly searching to achieve a connection between the physical world, and the deeper meaning that lies beneath… I believe the act of making art is simply the expression of another, perhaps less familiar language that resides deep within…”

 

Indianapolis artist Jason Myers joins the show with new work from his latest 2011 collection of figurative abstract work. Myers, who hails originally from the Logansport, Indiana area, incorporates a multitude of mark marking, physicality, and mixed materials into his work which is inspired by a combination of many sources in his own history and personal memories. Tapping into the conceptual plane which spans between the emotional and physical environment of his own experiences, Myers poses his own questions and comments on society and the information therein to which people are exposed to on a daily basis. Myers, who is also a master woods-craftsman, is able to draw on a vast landscape of personal experiences which range from his years in military school to his present and exceptionally busy lifestyle as a multi-business entrepreneur. In addition to being part of several prominent collections nationwide, Myers recently participated with the Evan Lurie Gallery during the Palm Beach Art Show in January of 2011.

The fourth and final member of “Abstraction Faction” is Brad Howe, and abstract sculptor from Los Angeles, California. Howe’s work not only describes vivacity, it creates it. Whether using actual or implied kinetic energy, along with his take on geometric abstraction, Howe has developed a style that is not only naturally pleasing to the visual preferences of arithmetic shape but that also encapsulates youthful enthusiasm while simultaneously reflecting a powerful statement of absolute beauty. Working in many metals including aluminum and stainless steel his work has been shown in more than sixteen countries worldwide. Throughout his career, Howe has built a strong following of global attraction and appears in many prominent international collections throughout thirty-two countries. "My sculptures are composed with vitality and celebrate beauty,” says Howe. “(The sculpture’s kinetic energy is) aimed at exposing energized moments between connection and disconnection, as well as between strain and serenity."

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, Carmel, IN 46032 and doors will be open for the official event from 5:00 – 10:00 pm. The event and any lectures posted in the future are free of charge and open to the general public.



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If you’d like more information about this topic, or to schedule and interview with Mr. Evan Lurie, please call the gallery at 317.844.8400 or email information at info@evanluriegallery.com.

 

 

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery opens show for Contemporary Cuban Master Carlos Estévez in November 2010

Carmel, IN – November 6, 2010 – Cuban artist Carlos Estévez will bring his conceptual schematics outlining his epistemological voyage of life to the walls of the Evan Lurie Gallery in November. With an artist reception and over a dozen new pieces scheduled to be exhibited, Estévez will open his solo show with a body of work that for him defines the state of a passage towards understanding life and aptly named “Peregrinaje” (Pilgrimage).

Carlos Estévez was born in Havana, Cuba in 1969 and educated at Havana's Instituto Superior de Arte. Very much the philosopher, and a student of hermetic literature, his work creates a glimpse into what some have called “the anthropological comprehension of human nature.” In this newest show, “Peregrinaje” (Pilgrimage), Estévez's chosen exhibit name is itself not an accident but instead very much a design. As a “pilgrimage” is by definition a journey to a sacred place, the choice to use that as the title for his show builds an atmosphere of expectation. In fact, Estévez defines the pilgrimage as more of spiritual journey where “reality is just a reference; information that becomes letters and symbols of an existential alphabet where we get the instruments to write our comments about life.”

Estévez describes each show of his career as chapters from his personal book of life. While some of his previous shows (or chapters) have carried titles like "Oblivion" and "Observatorium", in this chapter the viewer catches a glimpse of his more idealistic side. “For me the human universe is so fascinating that it never stops amazing me. The world is the theater where we are actors and spectators at the same time. We observe the universe and we are an active part of it; and even more interesting, we have the capacity of thinking and dreaming. Through this door we can reach the unreachable; we can fly to faraway places and create our own universe different of somebody else. In that inner universe everything is possible.”

Through his use of oils and pencil work on canvas, Estévez achieves a narrative that come across to the viewer through his philosophical visions in a near blueprint format, mathematical in his instruction on the sub conscience. If there is a pilgrimage to be made towards the sacred place of open questions concerning universal concepts – Estévez is the man who builds the theory and narrates it with mechanical precision.

The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, Carmel, IN 46032 and doors will be open for the official event from 5:00 – 10:00 pm. The event and any lectures posted in the future are free of charge and open to the general public.

If you’d like more information about this topic, or to schedule and interview with Mr. Evan Lurie, please call Katherine Livengood at 317.844.8400 or email Katherine at Katherine@evanluriegallery.com.

 

 

 

 


 

The Evan Lurie Gallery to host “Crossing Paths” for First Fall Carmel Art Walk of 2010

Carmel, IN – September 18, 2010 – Abstract color, train yards, and movie stars will take center stage, or center-wall rather, at the Evan Lurie Gallery on September 18, 2010 when the space opens its first show of the fall entitled “Crossing Paths” featuring Adam Normandin, Daniela Wicki and Ben Freeman. 

 

Ben Freeman returns to the Evan Lurie Gallery with a new collection of work, which, although technically in line with his delicate style of work atop antiqued paperwork, will this time include glamorous male icons of the silver screen in addition to the lovely starlets of yesteryear. Leading men such as Humphrey Bogart, Marlon Brando and Clark Gable will share the show’s limelight with easily recognizable Judy Garland among other prominent women of Hollywood.  Borrowing a bit from his education in architectural structure and fusing it with his education in Fine Arts from North Carolina State University, Freeman’s style is as unmistakable as it is engrossing. The artist paints his figures and faces on a expansive bed of archival media including old postcards, letters and photos that serve the pieces well adding not just depth of imagination but also a forgone connection left to the interpretation of the viewer. 

 

Joining the exhibit and debuting in the gallery for his first show is Adam Normandin – an artist who finds beauty in the details of the unobserved.  A graduate of Hofstra University, Normandin’s work is exhibited across the United States and held in many prominent collections. With a body of recent work that focuses on the locomotive industry, Normandin’s fascination with the freight train is readily observed and memorizing as it pushes the boundary of the traditional.   Leaving little behind, Normandin captures his subjects without prejudice incorporating rust spots, graffiti markings and imperfections in place as he redefines the scene in a somewhat cropped characterization.  Of his work he states, “I rarely choose my subjects, instead they draw me to them… Years of use and exposure to the elements imprint a sense of tireless duty onto these objects.”

 

Also with her first appearance on the walls at 30 West Main Street will be Daniela Wicki whose work in the abstract takes on a very distinct energetic tone.  With a style that has been hailed as “exciting and vibrant”, Wicki finds her inspiration in the development of each piece and the work required to see the process through to completion. Once a successful lawyer in New York, this daughter of Swiss parents born in Lima, Peru has traveled a path from classic training of technique during her teenage years through to her style of abstract vision in a lifelong passion for creative expression. “For me, art is an aesthetic, ethical and ultimately spiritual force: a challenge made in the experience of finding in each and every creation a self realization, a self portrait of my own energy, a landscape of forces, life in motion rather than still-life.”

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, Carmel, IN 46032 and doors will be open for the official event from 5:00 – 10:00 pm. The event and any lectures posted in the future are free of charge and open to the general public.

 

 

If you’d like more information about this topic, or to schedule and interview with Mr. Evan Lurie, please call Katherine Livengood at 317.844.8400 or email Katherine at Katherine@evanluriegallery.com. 






CONTRASTS AND COLLUSIONS AT THE EVAN LURIE GALLERY

Carmel, IN May 28, 2010 –  On May 28, 2010 from 5 pm to 9 pm, The Evan Lurie Gallery will host “Contrasts and Collusions: A View into the Methodology of Black and White” – a show featuring two internationally accomplished artists who generate powerful imagery through various mediums of  generally limited monochrome palettes.  Artists Joseph Piccillo and Alex Guofeng Cao will bring to the Arts District of Carmel work that has dazzled the audiences of Miami’s Art Basel, amazed onlookers in venues like the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and graced the walls of some of the world’s most prestigious corporate and private collections.

 

Perhaps best known for his work portraying horses, Joseph Piccillo’s art has been called magical and dazzling with a sheer technical mastery.  Born in New York this native of the Empire State creates his art by working with charcoals, graphite and oils. Piccillo’s grand scale and detailed precision has captivated audiences worldwide for over thirty years and is no stranger to the Crossroads of America.  His work, last seen featured in Indianapolis in 1984, returns over twenty years later with the strength of human potential characterized through animalistic and mechanical representation as his main focus.  It is his ability to portray such strength through the delicate grace of detail that has put his work in such esteemed collections as that of The Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, The Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Metropolitan Museum of Art also located in New York.

 

Another artist making waves in the art world is Alex Guofeng Cao.  As one of the most popular artists of last years Art Basel in Miami, Cao brings to Carmel his own version of black and white methodology in a series that uses gradation in photography as the principle medium.  Unlike Piccillo, Cao is not a native New Yorker but instead found his pursuit, passion and success on the streets of Manhattan after emigrating from China.  Combined with the pop culture icons that have developed over time, Cao has created a style of photography that demands closer inspection by its very nature.  At first glance one sees the immediate image of an iconic star such as Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Angelina Jolie or Andy Warhol.  It is with a second, closer look that one can see that these stars are composed of a constellation of other icons in tiny repetitive images, each slightly different from its neighbors.  Audrey Hepburn composed of thousands of tiny Marlene Dietrichs, Marilyn Monroe likewise composed of JFK images, Angelina Jolie made of Brad Pitt, etc.  For the onlooker, there is a dialogue going on between the subjects, a dialogue the artist presents to his audience with a slight suggestion of controversy as he names his work almost as though they were boxing matches: Warhol Vs. Mao, Bruni Vs Sarkozy,  James Dean Vs. Elvis.  It is no surprise then that The Miami Herald boasted Cao as a must see during his 2009 Basel showing with the full understanding and conviction of what Art does at its best and what Cao achieves quite handedly – “inspiration, education, surprise, shocks and delights.”

 

The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, Carmel, IN 46032 and doors will be open for the event from 5:00 – 9:00 pm.  This event is free of charge and open to the general public.

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If you’d like more information about this topic, or to schedule and interview with Mr. Evan Lurie, please call Katherine Livengood at 317.844.8400 or email Katherine at Katherine@evanluriegallery.com

 

 

 

 

SPRING PREMIERE 2010 AT THE EVAN LURIE GALLERY

 

Carmel, IN April 17, 2010 – The Evan Lurie Gallery will open the first show of Spring 2010 with three artists making their debut in the Arts and Design District.  Featured American artist Susan Hall will be joined by Russian born Alexey Terenin and fellow American abstract artist Charles Walker.

Born in Michigan and based out of Chicago, Il, Susan Hall’s work has been called calm, soft, feminine and reminiscent of 17th Century Dutch painting. Printed overlays of detailed lace patterns atop oil painted figures combined with soft hues and large scale stature make Hall’s featured body of work come across as soothing as it is sophisticated. With a Bachelors of Arts from Connecticut College and a Master of Fine Arts, Painting and Printmaking from the University of Georgia, Hall has shown in exhibits nationwide.

Russian born Alexey Terenin spent his youth raised in Prague only to return to the city of his birth for his degree from the Moscow Architectural Academy in 1992.  Immediately following his graduation his career in the arts began when he was invited to design a stage set for a ballet at the Moscow’s State Bolshoi Theater. Terenin never did become a practicing architect but instead incorporated the foundation of structure into his work as a painter living and working in Moscow, Russia. With a body of work he designs to reference the conditions of modern man it is strange then to find juxtaposed to this contemporary concept elements referencing the historic and gothic structures of Prague, Biblical lore and Russian literature.

Charles Walker takes a departure from the figurative work of the rest of the show with his bright linear abstracts in acrylic paint. Walker’s work and style has been called minimalist and organic with brilliants colors running working together in a way that comes close to suggesting a landscape. Looking for anything beyond the rich character of the paint and technique itself would be to go against the intention of the piece. Ask the artist and he believes in the raw ability of color and paint to be enough.  “I don’t look to art to tell a story, to take up issues – whether social or political.  All I look to art to do is to simply exist and in so existing to express something in the simplest and most direct manner possible.”  Walker received his Bachelor of Arts from Wake Forest University in 1993 and his Master of Fine Arts in studio arts from the University of Georgia in 1997.

The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, Carmel, IN 46032 and doors will be open for the event from 5:00 – 9:00 pm.  This event is free of charge and open to the general public.

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If you’d like more information about this topic, or to schedule and interview with Mr. Evan Lurie, please call Katherine Livengood at 317.844.8400 or email Katherine at Katherine@evanluriegallery.com

 

 

THE EVAN LURIE GALLERY HOSTS:

VALENTINE'S DAY GALLERY WALK with Margit J. Füreder

CARMEL, IN – February 13, 2010 – The Evan Lurie Gallery will debut and feature Margit J. Füreder in a Valentine’s Day show opening event on February 13, 2010, which is being held in conjunction with the Carmel Arts and Design District Gallery Walk.

Füreder, an Austrian artist who still lives and works from her home in Austia, debuted stateside at the 2009 Art Basil Event in Miami, Florida. The Evan Lurie Gallery opening on the 13th of February will be her premiere solo show in America.

To create her powerful and narrative style Füreder uses the imagery rooted in television and film to capture and edit single moments of universally shared conditions regarding the human experience. Using soft notes, powerful expression, dramatic angles and cultural and social icons, Margit J. Füreder’s body of work achieves an intimate reflection between the viewer and the painting. With a process that includes a special kind of pressure technology, Füreder’s paintings are a kind of silent aesthetic, which are consciously overlapped with contents, letters, quotations or pieces of early abstract paintings.

The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street in Carmel, Indiana. Doors for the show will be open 5:00 – 10:00 pm and will be catered by The Melting Pot of Indianapolis. This event is free of charge and open to the general public.

 

THE EVAN LURIE GALLERY HOSTS:
WALTER KNABE: A SHIFT IN THE PARADIGM

Carmel, IN – October , 2009 – The Evan Lurie Gallery will introduce Walter Knabe’s latest fine arts exhibit with a show opening on Saturday, October 24, 2009. Of his new work, Knabe shared, “I have been working in larger formats in order to tell the kinds of stories I am feeling. In many ways, these stories are more intimate than they use to be, but an intimate scale is the opposite of what I have been trying to create in my paintings. I want my art to envelope you at a more human scale. In some ways, I believe this generates from the custom fine art interiors I have created through they years.”

Knabe believes his latest creations have some defacing as a political statement or a reaction to seeing more human hardship in the way the world is evolving. He expresses a concern that the destructive things going on are negating the present and the past and run the risk of negating the future.

He said, “I’ve been working to capture what I already feel is happening as well as express my discontent with the movement as a reaction. To me, these paintings are more succinct than my earlier work. Elements are interwoven in a new way to manifest themselves differently with greater meaning, and ultimately, I want people who experience them to leave remaining hopeful and motivated to protect the landscape of their own mythology.”

Knabe shares, “My personal journey with painting mythology has evolved from beginning with a landscape as a foundation that represents the earthly things seen and felt and colliding that image with the ethereal or spiritual world to create a whimsical fairy tale full of emotion.”

Knabe believes that capturing whimsy in his work doesn’t make the work less serious since it’s an important component of nurturing mankind. Knabe’s paintings have traditionally allowed the viewer to see the first layer all the way through to the last layer. The new work showcases an exploration of graffiti which begins to obscure that transparency.

Regarding his artistic vision, Knabe said, “My work is a reflection of my ongoing belief in the value of human life, and our unique ability to define our being through art. I am interested in infusing a sense of antiquity in my work which reminds us of the past and leads us to being grounded in the here and now, leading us to having a sense of posterity.

I believe my work combines images from antiquity along with the everyday, painterly contemporary elements, and a sense of mythology and fairy tale. I hope this myth world I bring to life through my fine art will help awaken people to their own mythology, and therefore to their life.”

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ABOUT WALTER KNABE:

A designer since the age of 14, Knabe obtained his Master’s degree in Fine Arts from  the University of Wisconsin and later painted “under” Andy Warhol before applying his techniques to limited edition print making and custom wallcoverings and fabrics. 

For the past 20 years, the Walter Knabe Studios ,first located in New York New York, and now located in Indianapolis, Indiana has been a trusted resource for interior designers and high profile collectors around the globe who covet Knabe’s hand-crafted designs and artwork.

Among his many commissions are projects for Chanel, Harrods, Trump Plaza, Bloomingdales and The White House. Private collectors have included Andre Agassi, President and Mrs. George Bush, Bill Cosby, Richard Gere, Keith Haring, Michael Jordan, Spike Lee, Madonna, Neil Simon, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg and Philippe Stark.

Knabe resides in Indianapolis with his wife and two daughters and finds that his relationship with his family continues to offer the foundation for creating sanctuary at home and wanting to bring peace to the world through his art.

 


The Evan Lurie Gallery to host “Memoirs From Suburbia”

Carmel, IN – September 19, 2009 – The Evan Lurie Gallery will introduce four new artists to Indianapolis in an exhibition entitled “Memoirs From Suburbia.”  Peter Drake, Michael Fitts and Tom Haney will join Drew Simpson in a collection of work that explores a very distinct conceptual image of suburban interpretation.  The show, which opens on Saturday, September 19, 2009 will hang for five weeks. It features work that embodies both the iconic imagery of American youth and the detailed elucidation of suburban pretense in the four styles that vary in direction but play well together in concept.

 
The lapse of time and the growth of technology have played their own role in the definition of suburbia.  What began defined as an area of relatively low income in fourteenth century Europe, developed internationally as a term coined more for the outer lying areas of metropolitan expansion for the middle to upper class.  Soon a culture was born from the American style “burbs” and standards of living became nationally emblematic.  The nuclear family and its accessories had become symbols – symbols that have left themselves open to interpretation over time.  Drake, Fitts, Haney and Simpson have all offered a unique vision of suburban imagery in this way and starting on September 19th, 2009 Indianapolis will have its first glimpse at these artist’s exceptional perspectives.

 
Born himself to the suburban landscape of Garden City, New York, Peter Drake has spent nearly 30 years developing a style that has recently incorporated the presence of toy soldiers from a collection assembled by his father over time. Drake’s work is part of collections and exhibitions including that of the The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, Carnagie Art Museum in Oxnard, CA, The Islip Museum of Art in Islip, NY, the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art in Arizona and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, NY. His work has also been discussed in publications like ARTnews, Creative Quarterly, Arts & Antiques, Luxe Magazine and The New York Times.  Drake’s extensive resume of gallery representation spans the coasts, dips into the Midwest and is also represented throughout Europe.  However, September will mark the first time his work has been seen via an official exhibition in the state of Indiana. Drake will also be giving a lecture on his work and technique at 3:30 pm before the show opens.



Washington DC native Michael Fitts is no stranger to the icons of suburbia either.  Fitts presents the onlooker with simple images of life such as a spoon, an old telephone or a folded white dress shirt all painted with photorealistic quality in oil on scrap metal. Fitts’ work collaborates, as he says, with the imperfections of marked, distressed or scratched scrap metal to create art that points directly to the perception of the discarded and forgotten.  “The unexpectedness of elevating the important of ephemeral objects to the status of art is what I find more interesting,” Fitts has said of his work.  Michael Fitts will also be premiering to the state of Indiana through the “Memoirs From Suburbia” show at the Evan Lurie Gallery. Fitts will lecture on his work and technique at 2:00 pm before the show opens on September 19, 2009.

 
Tom Haney, a born buckeye who relocated to the southern area of Atlanta, Georgia, has a somewhat different approach to his artwork.  The sole featured sculptor of the “Memoirs From Suburbia” exhibition has had a lifelong fascination with mechanics and has put it to use creating work such as props, models and miniatures for televisions commercials, still photographers and movies.  Haney’s fine art work, much like the old cast iron toy banks of yesteryear, are far more functional in their workings than they might initially seem.  An example of this insight to Haney’s world is a piece entitled “A Collection of Thoughts” which stands twenty six inches high and seems nearly autobiographical with the exception of  costuming which dates the carved figure back at least one hundred years in style.  Still, through the use of mechanics hidden from view, the hand-carved figure pounds with a tiny hammer on metal inside a small workshop fitted with dials, grinding mechanisms and other seemingly “found objects.” Haney has also been featured on PBS, in numerous publications and commissioned by clients across the country.

 
Drew Simpson, the official foreign voice on suburban representation hails from Canada and produces work on a typically much smaller scale but with equally graphic interpretations.  A Victorian couch juxtaposed under its own flaming portrait is painted with such amazing detail it can be easily forgotten the miniature nature of the work.  Measuring a simple 12 by 7 inches framed, the image still manages to evoke the simple analysis of life caught at a glimpse through Simpson’s eyes. The single exception to the miniature style in the exhibition measures four feet squared and is equally as detailed as Simpson’s smaller work painting the picture of nested “Screaming Eagle” soldiers circa World War II.  Drew Simpson’s art has also been shown throughout Northern America and Europe.

 
The Evan Lurie Gallery is located at 30 West Main Street, Carmel, IN 46032 and doors will be open for the official event from 5:00 – 10:00 pm.  Artist lectures will begin at 2:00 pm. The event and lectures are free of charge and open to the general public.


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If you’d like more information about this topic, or to schedule and interview with Mr. Evan Lurie, please call Katherine Livengood at 317.844.8400 or email Katherine at Katherine@evanluriegallery.com